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Trans-Pacific Trade Agreement

In December 2011, certain patent and copyright enforcement provisions purportedly contained in the US proposal on the agreement were criticized as overly restrictive, beyond the provisions of the Korea-US trade agreement and the anti-counterfeiting trade agreement (ACAC). [111] [112] Michael R. Wessel, former commissioner of the U.S. Trade Deficit Review Commission, said in May 2015 that “cleared Advisors” like him was “prohibited” from “publicly sharing our criticisms of concrete proposals and approaches.” He stated that only portions of the text had been provided “to be read under the watchful eye of a USTR official”, that access to a secure government-run website did not contain the most up-to-date information, and that, for the advisers removed to obtain this information, he had to “go to certain government institutions and register to read the material” and “then , it has even designated the administration what we can verify and what we cannot verify, and they often provide carefully republisted summaries instead of the underlying text that is essential to understanding the consequences of the agreement. [208] Removal or reduction of tariffs. The agreement reduced tariffs and other trade barriers for a wide range of goods, including many automobiles and other industrial products, textiles and clothing, as well as agricultural raw materials such as meat, dairy products, products and cereals. Some estimates represent 98% of the total reduction in tariffs for TPP members. Michelle Ye Hee Lee, an auditor for The Washington Post, wrote that Warren used “misleading language” to describe the TPP. While Warren involved the creation of “28 commercial advisory committees” to influence the TPP, the advisory committees were effectively established under the Trade Act of 1974; Only membership of trade committees had changed during the Obama administration and the early phases of the TPP. Referring to Warren`s assertion that trade advisers “secretly whisper in the ears of our trade negotiators,” Lee wrote, “While direct meetings are held for private reasons, committees still have to submit written reports to Congress and written recommendations and advice to be published. [210] In addition, Lee wrote: “It is true that industry representatives represent a large part of overall membership, but it is interesting to note that there is a working committee at the second level, workers` representatives at the first level and that industry groups are highly concentrated (to give technical advice).” [210] Emily J. Blanchard argues that while the TPP has been severely criticized by the political left, progressives should support the TPP: “The TPP`s promise to create a new progressive regulatory framework – an agreement on child labour and discrimination in the workplace, measures to punish illegal logging and trade in protected species , as well as protection against consumer fraud – would be an essential step on the global agenda. [149] The TPP began as an extension of the Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership (P4) agreement, signed in 2005 by Brunei, Chile, New Zealand and Singapore.

Beginning in 2008, other countries agreed on a broader agreement: Australia, Canada, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, the United States and Vietnam, bringing the negotiation countries to twelve.

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